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258 Emotional Eating When Food Is Comfort – Simon

emotional eating

A Deeper Dive into Dieting, Food & Emotional Eating

Julie M. Simon, MA, MBA, LMFT, is a licensed psychotherapist and life coach with twenty-seven+ years of experience helping overeaters and imbalanced eaters stop dieting, curb emotional eating, heal their relationships with themselves and their bodies, lose excess weight – and keep it off.

A lifelong fitness enthusiast, she is also a certified personal trainer with over twenty-five years of experience designing exercise and nutrition programs for various populations. Julie is also the founder and director of the popular Los Angeles-based Twelve-Week Emotional Eating Recovery Program, which offers an alternative to dieting by addressing the mind, body, and spirit imbalances underlying overeating. Her professional experience with and personal journey through childhood trauma, weight challenges, and body, brain, and spiritual shortcomings led to the creation of this successful twelve-week program.

Simon’s Neuroscience Perspective – With Answers

Current brain science shows that a lack of consistent emotional nurturance in infancy and childhood, when the brain is forming, can result in difficulties with self-regulation. Demonstrating via extensive personal and client-based experience, Simon offers a comprehensive, step-by-step mindfulness program designed to rewire the brain and end overindulging once and for all.

Simon’s Magnificent Seven

In her book, When Food Is Comfort, Simon offers seven powerful mindfulness skills that constitute a practice she calls inner nurturing, which are designed to rewire the brain and end overindulging once and for all. Rather than feeling enslaved to their favorite foods, readers will experience, first hand, that their real source of comfort – all discussed in this interview.

Photo by Jude Infantini on Unsplash

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Thanks

Thanks to Julie for again joining us here at CBJ to review your observations and research about the new neuroscientifically-based challenges with food, neurotransmitters, and childhood trauma.

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Our Next CoreBrain Journal Episode

259 Froswa’ Booker-Drew, Ph.D., has been quoted in Forbes, Ozy, Bustle, Huffington Post, and other media outlets, due to an extensive background in leadership, nonprofit management, partnership development, training, and education. She is currently the Director of Community Affairs for the State Fair of Texas. Formerly the National Community Engagement Director for World Vision, she served as a catalyst, partnership broker, and builder of the capacity of local partners in multiple locations across the US to improve and sustain the well-being of children and their families.

She was a part of the documentary, Friendly Captivity, a film that follows a cast of 7 women from Dallas to India. She is the recipient of several honors including semi-finalist for the SMU TED Talks in 2012, 2012 Outstanding African American Alumni Award from the University of Texas at Arlington, 2009 Woman of the Year Award by Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. and was awarded Diversity Ambassador for the American Red Cross. Froswa’ graduated with a Ph.D. from Antioch University in Leadership and Change with a focus on social capital, diverse women and relational leadership.

She attended the Jean Baker Miller Institute at Wellesley for training in Relational-Cultural Theory and has completed facilitator training on Immunity to Change based on the work of Kegan and Lahey of Harvard. She has also completed training through UNICEF on Equity-Based Evaluations.

She is the author of 2 workbooks for women, Ready for a Revolution: 30 Days to Jolt Your Life and Rules of Engagement: Making Connections Last. Froswa’ was a workshop presenter at the United Nations in 2013 on the Access to Power. She was a Post Doctoral Fellow at Antioch University and an adjunct at the University of North Texas-Dallas. She writes for several publications around the world.

You will love this conversation – Froswa’ is a fireball, well informed, and inspirational.

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About our mission, Dr Charles Parker

Our CBJ hosting objective is critical: upgrade mind and brain data through informed dialogue with neuroscience experts to build more predictable, more comprehensive, more understandable solutions for you and your family. Today's technology drives significantly improved mind-prognosis - beyond traditional psychiatric measures. Inaccurate labels, speculation, and guesswork are out - critical thinking, data, and measurement are in. Let's work together to connect advanced biomedical wisdom with everyday street reality. Start today. Advance informed care. Stay consistent. Measure for accuracy. Subscribe here. Pass it on.

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